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dc.contributor.advisorRichins, Marsha Leeeng
dc.contributor.authorGunz, Alexandereng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 11, 2014).eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] This dissertation extends the literatures on coping and social anxiety by suggesting that people cope with social threats not just by directly trying to create (and restore) social relationships, but also by indirectly coping with the psychological fallout. It suggests that they do this by seeking hedonic product benefits that can salve emotional hurt, and by seeking product benefits that affirm unrelated aspects of the self concept. Two studies with different manipulations and outcome measures show that both manipulated and chronic forms of social anxiety can give rise to any of the above coping behaviors, and shows that the pursuit of these benefits is often moderated by relevant personality variables (e.g., entity theory and values-based transformations, emotional-awareness and hedonic transformations, and materialism and extrinsic transformations). These studies largely fail to replicate past findings that self-monitoring can moderate seeking social benefits. Finally, a new study by Lee and Shrum (2012) is discovered. A reanalysis of that paper’s data suggests that there may be a critical role for implicit/explicit processing in consumers’ deciding whether a given coping strategy is suitable. Applying this distinction to study 2’s data generates a far more close-fitting description of its data.eng
dc.identifier.oclcn/aeng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/43167
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectSocial anxietyeng
dc.subjectCoping methodseng
dc.subject.FASTSocial phobiaeng
dc.subject.FASTConsumption (Economics)eng
dc.subject.FASTAdjustment (Psychology)eng
dc.titleSocial insecurity and the role of possessions: buying friends or replacing them?eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness administration (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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