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dc.contributor.advisorMcKinney, Mitchell S.eng
dc.contributor.authorKristiansen, Lars J., 1981-eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page (University of Missouri--Columbia, viewed on June 11, 2014).eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] On December 1st, 1976, punk exploded onto the British cultural scene when the Sex Pistols appeared on Thames Television's Today show. Sporting a historically unprecedented rhetorical style, deliberately utilizing what some critics have described as the filthiest language ever spoken on British television, the band immediately caused a stir. Over the course of the following four decades subsequent generations of punks have continued trodding down the path laid out by the Sex Pistols, ceaselessly endeavoring to fan the oppositional flame of punk. While scholars from a variety of academic disciplines have examined punk in numerous ways, utilizing a wide array of theories and analytical frameworks, historical analyses are lacking in some important respects. Because most orthodox punk scholarship has approached punk as either: (1) a subculture, (2) an avenue for identity construction, or (3) a musical genre, the messages inherent in punk have not been properly attended to and thus been left under-theorized. This study remedies some of these theoretical concerns by systematically analyzing punk texts through utilization of the rhetorical inventional method provided by Prelli (1989). In short, this study examines the rhetorical and argumentative foundations and operations of punk through inspection of the ends, means, goals, and commonplaces associated with punk discourse.eng
dc.format.extentpageseng
dc.identifier.issnKristiansenL-101912-D573eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/43180
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subjectPunk (music genre)eng
dc.subjectRhetorical inventional methodeng
dc.subjectPunk discourseeng
dc.subject.FASTPunk cultureeng
dc.subject.FASTPunk rock musiceng
dc.subject.FASTRhetoric (Aristotle)eng
dc.titleThe filth and the fury: a rhetoric of punkeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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