[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorLangdon, Susan Helen, 1952-eng
dc.contributor.authorThomsen, Megan Lynneeng
dc.date.issued2005eng
dc.date.submitted2005 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (December 20, 2006)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2005.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Art history and archaeology.eng
dc.description.abstractThe Etruscans, well-known in the ancient world for seafaring and trade, held deep beliefs about death and the afterlife, and often placed foreign objects in their tombs which fit with these traditions. The Athenians, who were aware of Etruscan traditions through their extensive trade interactions, combined the traditional bands of oriental animals from Corinthian pottery with the emerging Attic style of main figural/mythological panels on vases called Tyrrhenian amphorae to corner the market in Etruria. Myths of Herakles (Etruscan Hercle) were the most common theme and the battles of this demi-god hero against evil foes may have elicited a connection with Etruscan conceptions of funerary iconography/death and the afterlife. As Herakles went to the Underworld and returned, essentially defeating death, he became a symbol of hope for the afterlife. These myths, along with "everyday life" panels and oriental animals, served to complete the funerary composition which made Tyrrhenian amphorae so popular in Etruria.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57457840eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4321
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshArt, Etruscan -- Italy -- Tyrrhenian Coasteng
dc.subject.lcshVases, Black-figured -- Italy -- Tyrrhenian Coasteng
dc.subject.lcshVases, Ancient -- Italy -- Tyrrhenian Coasteng
dc.subject.lcshEtruria -- Antiquitieseng
dc.titleHerakles iconography on Tyrrhenian Amphoraeeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArt history and archaeology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record