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dc.contributor.advisorLewis, Trudy (Trudy L.)eng
dc.contributor.authorMcIntyre, Katharineeng
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2013 Dissertationseng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Springeng
dc.descriptionA Dissertation presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School at the University of Missouri--Columbia In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy.eng
dc.descriptionDissertation supervisor: Dr. Trudy Lewis.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references (page 19).eng
dc.descriptionThe entire text is included in the research.pdf file; the abstract appears in the short.pdf file; a non-technical general description appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The Moat is a short story collection unified through themes of the hidden, the underground, and the interior, both bodily and geographic. In my work, known spaces take on unsettling and nightmarish aspects. For example, the title story questions the troubled American conceptions of security and isolationism post-9/11 through a housewife who becomes trapped in her country home as her husband becomes obsessed with personal safety, eventually excavating a moat to confine the family. "Mine" tracks a South American despot as he gains international notoriety after an accident traps miners hundreds of feet underground. As he navigates the politics of his central role in a major news story, he must also grapple with the ghost of his friend, whom he murdered in a mine years ago. In "A New Man," an unhappily married woman finds new joy in her relationship with her husband after he has a lung transplant and the lung begins to take over his personality. I am interested in the grotesque as a source of revelation and transformation. The critical essay that accompanies my dissertation examines the fraught territory of humor in contemporary gothic literature, drawing upon Freud's theories of jokes, Bakhtin's conception of the grotesque body, and Victoria Nelson's claims that the contemporary gothic is shifting toward the light. I argue that the figure of the patriarch undergoes a fundamental change in the contemporary gothic, losing his power to frighten and becoming instead an impotent buffoon.eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (iii, 166 pages)eng
dc.identifier.oclc890315276eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/43325
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/43325eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartof2013 MU restricted dissertations (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri�Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.subject.lcshShort stories, American.eng
dc.subject.lcshGothic literature -- Criticism and interpretation.eng
dc.titleThe moateng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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