Aristotle on happiness: a comparison with Confucius

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Aristotle on happiness: a comparison with Confucius

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4335

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dc.contributor.advisor Gupta, Bina, 1947- en
dc.contributor.author Chang, Lily, 1975- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-12T17:05:15Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-12T17:05:15Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2006 Summer en
dc.identifier.other ChangL-072406-D5692 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4335
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on April 24, 2009) en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Thesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Philosophy. en_US
dc.description.abstract In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle defines the highest good for humankind in terms of happiness. The nature of happiness includes intellectual activity, virtuous activity, and friendship; and certain external goods are needed for happiness. A good life involves consistently participating in activities that make a person good: intellectual activity, virtuous activity, and pursuing friendships. Though Confucius does not take the same exact approach as Aristotle, he is concerned with the good for humankind. Seeking the good of humankind involves consistently and habitually performing acts that develop good character. Such acts include: performing virtuous acts, acting with ritual propriety of the Zhou dynasty, living according to the dao or way, and doing what is appropriate. In this dissertation, I explicate Aristotle's conception of happiness, and I include a comparison of his conception of happiness with Confucius. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2006 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Aristotle en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Confucius en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Happiness en_US
dc.title Aristotle on happiness: a comparison with Confucius en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Philosophy en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph.D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b67107680 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 319182101 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2006 Dissertations


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