Suspicious signs: effects of newscaster scripts, symbols and actions on audience perception of news organization bias

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

Suspicious signs: effects of newscaster scripts, symbols and actions on audience perception of news organization bias

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4365

[-] show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Petrocik, John R., 1944- en
dc.contributor.author Woelfel, Stacey W. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-12T17:05:50Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-12T17:05:50Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2006 Spring en
dc.identifier.other WoelfelS-050206-D5003 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4365
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (March 1, 2006) en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Thesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Political science. en_US
dc.description.abstract In the wake of September 11, a wave of patriotism swept across the country. Flags and patriotic paraphernalia popped up almost everywhere - including on the lapels of television news anchor people. The display of symbols raised the question of whether such displays projected a possible image of bias to television viewers.This research examines the perceptions of television news viewers exposed to varying levels of bias in visual cues and verbal information. Subjects viewed short television "news breaks" that were altered to add bias. Independent variables included lapel pins supporting a particular cause, biasing language in support of the cause, and newscaster participation in a rally for the particular cause. Dependent variables measured perceptions of fairness, accuracy, and balance. Results of the research suggest television news viewers develop a form of inertia in their perceptions of newscasters and news organization that is not easily moved by single instances of bias - no matter how severe. Subjects did not change perceptions of bias in most cases, only registering a change in some instances of the most severe forms of bias. The research suggests news organizations need not be perfect in their pursuit of unbiased news presentations, but may experience declines in audience respect with repeated bias. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2006 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Television journalists en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Journalism -- Objectivity en_US
dc.title Suspicious signs: effects of newscaster scripts, symbols and actions on audience perception of news organization bias en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Political science en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph.D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b57907705 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 85482663 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2006 Dissertations


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] show simple item record