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dc.contributor.advisorRose, Amanda J. (Amanda Janel), 1971-eng
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, Lance P., 1971-eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (May 1, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractOthers' reports of youth distress (e.g., parent, aggregated peer reports) typically evidence small to moderate agreement with youth self-reports (e.g., Achenbach et al., 1987; De Los Reyes & Kazdin, 2005). Recent findings demonstrate that children and adolescents' close friends also may be knowledgeable of youth adjustment (i.e., depressive symptoms; Swenson & Rose, 2003). The present research extends prior findings on friends' knowledge of adjustment by (a) directly comparing self-friend agreement to self-parent agreement, (b) expanding the domains of adjustment considered to include behavioral as well as emotional adjustment, and (c) examining the moderating influences of relationship quality and self-disclosure on self-other agreement. Relations between friend- and self-reported externalizing problems were stronger than for internalizing symptoms. Significant relations also emerged between mother- and self-reports of both internalizing and externalizing symptoms. When friend- and mother-reports were considered simultaneously, only mother-reported distress significantly predicted youth self-reported internalizing adjustment. For externalizing adjustment, however, both friend- and mother-reported distress uniquely predicted self-reported symptoms. Unique relations were moderated by relationship quality and by self-disclosure.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb58485430eng
dc.identifier.oclc123907798eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4378
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4378eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshAdjustment (Psychology) in adolescenceeng
dc.subject.lcshAdjustment (Psychology) in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshParent and childeng
dc.subject.lcshInformation resourceseng
dc.titleThe roles of parents and friends as information sources regarding children's and adolescents' adjustmenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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