Individual vs. systemic justice: using trust and moral outrage to predict reactions to vigilante murder

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Individual vs. systemic justice: using trust and moral outrage to predict reactions to vigilante murder

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4379

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dc.contributor.advisor Arndt, Jamie en_US
dc.contributor.advisor Arndt, Jamie en
dc.contributor.author Cook, Alison en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-12T17:06:05Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-12T17:06:05Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2006 Fall en
dc.identifier.other CookA-120706-D5809 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4379
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 1, 2007) en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology. en_US
dc.description.abstract Jurors can approach their charge of meting out justice in different ways, two of which include focusing on the outcome of a specific trial and/or focusing on upholding justice more broadly by adhering to procedures and laws set forth by the legal system. An experiment was designed to investigate two factors (trust in the legal system and moral outrage) that may influence mock jurors' orientations toward justice and affect their sentencing decisions. A 2 (system trust: high vs. low) x 2 (moral outrage: manslaughter vs. rape/murder) between subjects factorial design was used to predict participant reactions toward a murder committed in response to the death of the vigilante's daughter. While the manipulated trust variable did not influence the results, a continuous measure of personal trust interacted with moral outrage and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) to predict participant reactions toward the vigilante murderer. Additional effects were moderated by beliefs in a just world (BJW). Thus, both RWA and BJW appeared to be important indicators of social values which influence perceptions of justice. Implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2006 Freely available dissertations (MU) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Vigilantes en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Justice, Administration of en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Attitude (Psychology) en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Trust en_US
dc.title Individual vs. systemic justice: using trust and moral outrage to predict reactions to vigilante murder en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Psychology en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b59265760 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 162090413 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2006 Dissertations


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