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dc.contributor.advisorHsieh, Fu-hungeng
dc.contributor.authorRazi, Muhamad Alifeng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Summereng
dc.description"July 2013."eng
dc.description"A Thesis presented to the Faculty of the Graduate School at the University of Missouri In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science."eng
dc.descriptionThesis supervisor: Dr. Fu-hung Hsieh.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Tomato and garlic may provide health benefits due to their bioactive compounds and fibers. The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of tomato (0, 4, 8%), screw speed (200, 275, 350 rpm), and feed moisture content (19, 20.5, 22%) on extruder responses and product properties using a three-level full factorial design with two replications. Spray-dried tomato and dehydrated garlic powder were blended with white corn flour and extruded using a corotating twin-screw extruder. Feed rate and barrel temperature at the metering section were set at 36 kg/h and 121.1oC, respectively. A four blade cutter rotating at 350 rpm was used to cut the extrudates once they leaved the die opening. The samples were stored in sealed plastic bags and were kept at room temperature (25oC). All extruder responses studied (product temperature, die temperature, die pressure, torque, and specific mechanical energy) were significantly affected by tomato, screw speed, and feed moisture content. Increases in tomato level and feed moisture content generally resulted in decreases in extruder responses. Higher screw speeds were associated with lower die pressure and torque, higher temperature and specific mechanical energy. Increasing tomato level resulted in extruded snacks with a lower radial expansion, lower lightness and redder color. While screw speed effect on hardness was dominant, tomato had no significant effect on hardness although an increasing trend in hardness was noticed as the tomato level was increased. However, the effect of tomato on the hardness was significantly different at a feed moisture content of 22%, where a decreasing trend occured. A higher feed moisture content generally resulted in extruded snacks with a lower specific volume, higher lightness and yellowness.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 108-117).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (xii, 117 pages) : color illustrationseng
dc.identifier.oclc898217656eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44021
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/44021eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshExtrusion processeng
dc.subject.lcshTomatoes -- Extrusioneng
dc.subject.lcshGarlic -- Extrusioneng
dc.subject.lcshSnack foodseng
dc.subject.lcshHealtheng
dc.titleProperties of extruded snacks containing tomato and garliceng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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