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dc.contributor.advisorNilon, Charles H., 1956-en
dc.contributor.authorParker, Tommy S.en_US
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Fallen
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 7, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent trends in ecological studies have displayed increases in the studying of urban systems and wildlife. Investigations on various urbanized taxa have often described similar behavioral (reduced fear of humans, altered activity patterns, and increased intraspecific aggression) and population dynamics (higher densities and reduced dispersal) modifications. In addition to the presence of these changes in urbanized wildlife, little is known regarding the habitat and landscape features associated with these changes. The objective of my study was to identify habitat and landscape characteristics correlated with behavioral and life history adaptations of urban wildlife. In the summer and fall of 2003 and 2004, I sampled gray squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) at six urban parks for density, wariness, intraspecific aggression, and activity patterns. I then used combinations of each parks ecological characteristics (size, canopy cover, tree basal area, and number of trees) and the characteristics of the adjacent landscapes (tree cover, number of trees, building cover, and number of buildings) to develop models to predict gray squirrel wariness (fear of humans), intraspecific aggression, activity patterns, and density. Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) was used to evaluate candidate models and determine the best approximating models. Density and canopy cover were the most efficient predictors for wariness (AIC = 48.42, Wi = 0.500); density, patch tree basal area,and matrix tree cover for aggression (AIC = 39.54, Wi = 0.567); patch size, canopy cover, and number of matrix trees for density (AIC = 57.40, Wi = 0.237), and density for activity (AIC = 34.02, Wi = 0.253).en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b59276861en_US
dc.identifier.oclc163164462en_US
dc.identifier.otherParkerT-092806-D6044en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4420
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2006 Freely available dissertations (MU)
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2006 Dissertations
dc.subject.lcshUrban animalsen_US
dc.subject.lcshGray squirrel -- Habitaten_US
dc.subject.lcshGray squirrel -- Behavioren_US
dc.titleHabitat and landscape characteristics that influence population density and behavior of gray squirrels in urban areaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife scienceseng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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