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dc.contributor.advisorSchwarz, Benyamineng
dc.contributor.advisorTofle, Ruth Brenteng
dc.contributor.authorIzsack, Vivian, 1962-eng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Springeng
dc.description"May 2014."eng
dc.descriptionDissertation Co-Supervisor: Benyamin Schwarz, Ph.D.; Ruth Brent Tofle, Ph.D.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The goal of this study is to identify how the built environment in Miami, Florida's Little Havana, specifically in the commercial corridor of 8th Street (or Calle Ocho) between 12th and 17th Avenues balances the customs of Cuba in times past with the present needs of a changing neighborhood--one that is more diverse but still appreciative of Hispanic, and specifically, Cuban customs. Aside from the commercial enclave, which effectively recreates opportunities to buy the comfort foods and items including clothing and specialty cigars, the people continue to use parks as a meeting place where many resurrect the customs and memories of their past. Three research questions drove this research: 1) What environmental attributes do people of Cuban descent use to re-establish a sense of place in Miami's Little Havana, 2) how do Calle Ocho merchants transform the formal, semi-formal, and informal gathering places along their commercial corridor to reflect culture, and 3) what are the similarities and/or dissimilarities among Calle Ocho's Latin cultures that allow them to share this space and call it their own? Data triangulation was used to verify the validity of this study. The sources were 15 Cubans ranging in age from 44 to 89 with time spent in the US ranging from 12 years to as little as three months. They were given disposable cameras and asked to photograph meaningful scenes from the Calle Ocho to discuss in recorded interviews. This research documents their assimilation and/or acculturation as well as their continued longing to keep a sense of their cultural heritage in place. The research is qualitative and captures rich description provided by accounts of immigrant experiences, memories, and impressions, showing the value of their heritage and the need to protect it.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 201-204).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (3 files) : color illustrations.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb10776362xeng
dc.identifier.oclc905616297eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44232
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/44232eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.titleCafé, culture, and community : re-establishing a sense of place in Little Havana's Calle Ochoeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectural studies (Doctoral dissertations) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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