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dc.contributor.advisorFaaborg, John, 1949-eng
dc.contributor.authorSmall, Stacy L.eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on May 6, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences.eng
dc.description.abstractWhile $14 to $15 billion have been invested in 37,000+ river and stream restoration projects in North America since 1990, only 10% are monitored for biological function. My work examines factors that affect landbird demographics in the context of floodplain forest restoration on a large, regulated river in an agricultural valley. I used infrared, time-lapse video to identify agriculture-associated nest predators as a primary source of nest mortality in the Sacramento River Valley, California. Then, using 10 years of empirical nest, vegetation, and hydrology data, combined with GIS land cover data, I compared competing a priori hypotheses to explain nest predation on two open-cup nesting species, then predicted nest survival rates under varying conditions, based on the best-supported models. Nest mortality rates on restoration and mature forest sites were comparable, indicating that restoration sites are functioning as well as forest sites as breeding habitat, in terms of nest predation. Results for the Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus) indicate that nest predation, in addition to nest parasitism, by the Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) may be a critical limiting factor for this population. Results for the Black-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus) indicate that flood timing influences nest predation, as nest predation rates are lower when the median flood date is closer to the onset of nesting, suggesting that spring floods regulate nest predator populations. This study underscores the importance of large-scale horticultural habitat restoration, combined with naturalization of the river flow regime and reconnection of the river and floodplain to songbird populations in California's Central Valley.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb67361699eng
dc.identifier.oclc320365770eng
dc.identifier.oclc320365770eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4427
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4427eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.lcshRiparian restorationeng
dc.subject.lcshStream restorationeng
dc.subject.lcshSongbirds -- Breedingeng
dc.subject.lcshBirds of prey -- Breedingeng
dc.subject.lcshUpland game birds -- Breedingeng
dc.titleConservation and ecology of breeding landbirds in a riparian restoration contexteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBiological sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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