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dc.contributor.advisorAnderson, S. H. (Stephen H.)eng
dc.contributor.authorSimmons, Langston A.eng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Springeng
dc.description.abstractFormer studies have shown that once compacted, forest soils often recover slowly (many decades) to pre-disturbed levels for soil properties such as bulk density or penetrometer resistance. Runoff and soil erosion from forest lands increases due to effects from this soil compaction. Increased carbon sequestration is expected from forest land; however, increased runoff and erosion will negatively affect carbon sequestration in the soil. As climate change occurs, more intense rain may fall which will create challenges with runoff and erosion from compacted sites. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of selected harvesting techniques on soil physical and hydraulic properties. The effects of logging roads, log landing areas, and logged areas on water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (KSat), and bulk density were investigated on harvested sites within the Mark Twain National Forest in Callaway County, Missouri, USA on a moderately well-drained Keswick soil (fine, smectitic, mesic Aquertic Chromic Hapludalfs). Soil cores (7.6 cm by 7.6 cm) were removed in four 10-cm depth increments in June and were evaluated for saturated hydraulic conductivity, soil water retention, pore-size distributions, and bulk density. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured for each core sample using a constant head permeameter, or the falling head method for samples with low values. For the water retention measurements, soil cores were saturated and water retention measurements were recorded for 0.0, -0.4, -1.0, -2.5, -5.0, -10.0 and - 20.0 kPa readings. Soil aggregate samples were used for the -33 and -100 kPa water retention readings and samples passed through a 2.0 mm sieve was used for the -1,500 kPa water retention reading. The soil bulk density was also determined for the soil core samples. Pore size distributions were estimated using the water retention data from each sample. Bulk density was significantly higher (P<0.01) for the logging road and log landing areas compared to the logged areas. This was attreng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (ix, 78 pages) : illustrations + 2 supplementary files.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb109689938eng
dc.identifier.oclc917613428eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44327
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.publisher[University of Missouri--Columbia]eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. These. 2014 Theses. 2014 Freely available theseseng
dc.subjectAuthor supplied: forest management, saturated hydraulic conductivity, water retention, soil compaction, Ksat, porosityeng
dc.subject.lcshForest managementeng
dc.subject.lcshSoil permeabilityeng
dc.subject.lcshSoil erosioneng
dc.subject.lcshLoggingeng
dc.titleSoil hydraulic and physical properties as affected by logging managementeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, environmental and atmospheric sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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