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dc.contributor.advisorBaker, Sheila N.eng
dc.contributor.authorTang, Du (Chemical engineer)eng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Springeng
dc.description"May 2014."eng
dc.descriptionThesis supervisor: Dr. Sheila N. Baker.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Carbon nanotubes are seamless cylinders of carbon skeletons with hexagonal honey comb structures. It also could be seen as the rolling of one or more layers of graphene. Because of this unique structure, it shows outstanding properties including high elastic modulus, large tensile strength, high thermal conductivity and semi-conductor electrical properties. Thus, it has drawn much attention from material researchers and can be engineered for many applications now and in the future in different fields such as energy storage, water purification, biosensors, microelectronics and being integrated into composite materials to achieve functionalization. Here, an ultrafast and more energy-efficient route to synthesis carbon nanotubes is designed. There are two major routes involved in this research. Firstly, carbon nanotubes can be produced by direct microwave irradiation of the solid mixture of ferrocene and graphite nanoplatelets. Here ferrocene serves as metal catalyst. Carbon nanotubes will form in 15-30 seconds. Also, zirconium is included in some samples as one component of bimetallic catalyst, and carbon nanotubes also formed in less than 1 minute. The irradiation of these mixtures in the presence of organic solvents is also studied. In the second route, substrates are introduced to direct the growth of carbon nanotubes. Normal flat glass slides and indium tin oxide (ITO) slides are dropcasted by catalyst and are heated with organic solvent in microwave oven. Carbon nanotubes could be observed with an irradiation time ranging from 40 seconds to 10 minutes. Besides, another unique structure, which is called carbon nanocoil, is also produced as a by-product. All the carbon nanotubes and nanocoils are characterized by SEM and TEM. The effect of microwave conditions on the formation and morphology of carbon nanotubes are also studied.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 60-66).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (x, 66 pages) : illustrations (some color) + 2 supplementary fileseng
dc.identifier.merlinb115630740eng
dc.identifier.oclc955349561eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44373
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.subjectAuthor supplied: nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes, microwave, carbon nanocoils, synthesis mechanism, functional materialeng
dc.subject.lcshNanotechnologyeng
dc.subject.lcshCarbon nanotubeseng
dc.subject.lcshSynthesiseng
dc.subject.lcshMicrowaveseng
dc.titleThe design of ultrafast routes to synthesis carbon nanotubes by microwaveeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineChemical engineering (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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