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dc.contributor.advisorEvans, Kenneth R.eng
dc.contributor.authorHunt, David M., 1968-eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (February 27, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Business administration.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates the influence of individual differences in need for optimization (NFO), centrality of visual product aesthetics (CVPA), and consumer need for uniqueness (CNFU) on perceived value of customized product alternatives. A conceptual model grounded in involvement theory, the functional theory of attitudes, and theories on the desirability of uniqueness is proposed and empirically tested using survey methodology. Generally, data support significant relationships between the three individual differences and the perceived value of mass customized products. Further, support is provided for the mediating role of involvement in the functional and symbolic benefits for a given product category. Results of the study extend consumer research on individual differences into a new domain of consumer behavior and hold implications for segmenting mass customization markets.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb57900309eng
dc.identifier.oclc85371713eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4439
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4439eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshMass customizationeng
dc.subject.lcshConsumers' preferenceseng
dc.titleA consumer perspective on mass customizationeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineBusiness administration (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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