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dc.contributor.advisorRikoon, J. Sanfordeng
dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Erin Feinauer, 1972-eng
dc.coverage.spatialNorthern Cheyenne Indian Reservation (Mont.)eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (May 2, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.description.abstractThe Northern Cheyenne represent a group that experiences poverty and hunger at an exceptionally high level. As an extreme case study, this project adds conceptually and methodologically to food provisioning literature by examining not only the sources of food reportedly used by households, but also the combinations of sources used as strategies in food provisioning. This is done through the application of a cluster analysis to show the patterns in which households actually use food sources together on the reservation. In addition, the relationships between household use of food sources and strategies and food security levels are examined. Thus, this project attempts to start a conversation not only about the types of choices that households must make, but how this is happening and what it looks like for limited resource households.Using the livelihoods perspective, we see that households use the food sources that reflect their capitals and capabilities. As expected, clustering the food sources shows greater clarity for these food provisioning patterns on the reservation, and show that sources are grouped into understandable combinations. Overall, households that have access to more reliable and valuable resources (such as wages or fixed income transfers) are more likely to reach food security. Conversely, households that use more risky food sources (such as pawning or churches) are more likely to have food insecurity.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb58486446eng
dc.identifier.oclc123913433eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4444eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4444
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.subject.lcshCheyenne Indians -- Foodeng
dc.subject.lcshHungereng
dc.subject.lcshPovertyeng
dc.titleUnderstanding reservation hunger : food acquisition and food security among the northern Cheyenneeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineRural sociology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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