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dc.contributor.advisorHawley, Jana Marie, 1955-eng
dc.contributor.authorJones, Kathryn Jo Bakereng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Summereng
dc.description"July 2014."eng
dc.descriptionDissertation Supervisor: Dr. Jana Hawley.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explored the discursive practices employed by Vogue to construct sustainable fashion it its editorials between 1990-2013. These discursive practices revealed the ideological stance of Vogue regarding sustainable fashion. The research asked: (a) how Vogue explicitly and implicitly defined sustainable, ethical and eco fashion through discursive practice; (b) how it visually illustrated sustainable fashion; (c) how Vogue's sustainable fashion discourse changed over time; and (d) how Vogue's inclusion of sustainability challenged or supported its position of power in the industry. A discourse-historical approach explored how Vogue's conception of sustainable fashion changed over time. Additionally, thirty-seven "Style Ethics" editorials were examined using Multimodal Critical Discourse Analysis (MCDA). References to sustainably minded values and actions were found throughout the twenty-three years analyzed, though these were in direct competition with the dominant discourse of the 'new'. Though Vogue periodically engaged the works of a handful of designers and activists striving for better products and practices, it rarely discussed the issues that led to their necessity, particularly ignoring labor issues. By co-opting preexisting nomenclature of sustainability without formally defining the concepts, Vogue was able to appropriate incongruous terminology into the discourse on fashion. Vogue relied heavily on stereotypical imagery to demarcate sections featuring sustainable goods. Over time, the sustainable fashion discourse was dismantled, neutralized and appropriated; presented as one option among many. Furthermore, the few sustainably minded goods and services that were included were undermined by the magazine's general emphasis on the 'new'.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 196-220).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (3 files) : illustrations.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb10783943xeng
dc.identifier.oclc906825410eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44487
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/44487eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisher[University of Missouri--Columbia]eng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate Schooleng
dc.titleLooking at fashion through green-colored glasses : a multimodal critical discourse analysis of Vogue's sustainable fashion editorialseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineTextile and apparel management (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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