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dc.contributor.advisorGreenwood, Keith, 1962-eng
dc.contributor.authorAlaimo, Katieeng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Springeng
dc.descriptionIncludes accompanying .mov file.eng
dc.descriptionProfessional project report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Journalism from the School of Journalism, University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.description.abstractTo understand the state of Native American representation at both a regional and national level in print journalism this research applied a thematic analysis to the news and feature articles of the Oregonian and the New York Times published between 2005-2012. Coding of stories was based upon the stereotypes identified by Miller and Ross (2004), including the degraded Indian, historic relic, good Indian, and generic outsider. While much of the media has been cleansed of the more blatant stereotypical terms, stereotypes are still manifested through more subtle themes that become salient frames through the dominant narratives. The results indicated that each of the while each of the frames were present in the published stories a majority of the articles from both newspapers emphasized the degraded Indian frame. Furthermore, while the Oregonian published articles on Native Americans with greater frequency (twice as many as the New York Times) the Times' articles were longer in column-inch length suggesting greater depth. Journalists use frames to make sense of the information they are communicating. By emphasizing particular topics over others through frequency and depth on Native American communities certain frames become more salient in the minds of readers. Thus, salience can lead to a one-dimensional representation of Native Americans in the media as those topics are most easily recalled.eng
dc.format.extent5 fileseng
dc.format.mimetypepdf ; moveng
dc.identifier.oclc903285286eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44630
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. School of Journalism. Journalism masters projectseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectAmerican Indian, Native American, framing, marginalization, newspaper, representation, news, stereotypes, media, print journalism, New York Times, Oregonian, healtheng
dc.subject.FASTIndians of North America -- Mental Healtheng
dc.subject.FASTStereotypes (Social psychology) in mass mediaeng
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Study and teaching (Internship)eng
dc.titleBetween two worlds: Native American representation in print mediaeng
dc.typeProjecteng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalismeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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