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dc.contributor.advisorHouseman, Richard M.eng
dc.contributor.authorBotch, Paul S., 1979-eng
dc.date.issued2013eng
dc.date.submitted2013 Falleng
dc.description"July 2013."eng
dc.description"A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the Graduate School At the University of Missouri In Partial Fulfillment Of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy."eng
dc.descriptionDissertation supervisor: Dr. Richard M. Houseman.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes vita.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] The subterranean termite genus Reticulitermes includes some of the most economically destructive termites in the United States, where it is estimated that costs associated with prevention and control may reach $11 billion annually. Despite their economic importance, there are large gaps in our understanding of subterranean termite ecology, due to their cryptic nature and the inherent difficulties of studying subterranean activity. In Missouri, subterranean termite communities differ between undeveloped forested and urban landscapes. Reticulitermes hageni Banks occurs in greater proportions than other subterranean termite species in forested landscapes, while Reticulitermes flavipes (Kollar) occurs in greater proportions than other subterranean termite species in urban landscapes. Thus, it appears that subterranean termite communities change as landscapes are converted from undeveloped to urban. It is not known, however, when Reticulitermes communities change in response to urbanization, or how termite populations invade subdivisions in an altered urban landscape. It is possible that resident subterranean termite populations are eliminated when soils are graded to prepare subdivision sites for construction. It also seems likely that colonies may respond to changing moisture and temperature regimes, or new biotic associations that accompany anthropogenic disturbances and altered landscapes. The purpose of this research is to examine how landscape factors are associated with subterranean termite communities and patterns of invasion as subdivisions are constructed and age over time. Subterranean termites were collected from 25 areas in Columbia, Missouri that were classified along a gradient of urbanization to include 1) undeveloped landscapes; 2) anthropogenically disturbed landscapes; 3) 10-year-old subdivisions; and 4) 20-year-old subdivisions. Subterranean termite communities were assessed by identifying species using PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). Because secondary reproductiveeng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 240-258).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (xxxvi, 259 pages) : illustrations (some color)eng
dc.identifier.oclc898893725eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44693
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/44693eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by MU Graduate Schooleng
dc.titleHistorical landscape interactions and patterns of invasion by subterranean termites (Isoptera: Reticulitermes) in subdivisions of different ageseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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