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dc.contributor.advisorSpiers, Donald E.eng
dc.contributor.authorKishore, Deepan K. (Deepan Kirubaharan)eng
dc.date.issued2010eng
dc.date.submitted2010 Falleng
dc.description"December 2010."eng
dc.description"A Thesis presented to the faculty of the graduate school at the University of Missouri--Columbia In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science."eng
dc.descriptionThesis supervisor: Dr. Donald Spiers.eng
dc.description.abstractTall fescue is widely used as pasture grass in the United States, and is the most important cool season grass for grazing animals. Certain fungi also grow on these grasses which produce toxins, resulting in reduced feed intake (FI), body weight (BW) and a compromised thermoregulatory system when consumed by animals . Our first study showed that sensitizing rats helped them adapt to the toxin by maintaining a lower core body temperature on subsequent exposure. The short-term study showed an increased proinflammatory response to stimulation with bacterial toxins. In the long-term study, the proinflammatory response was less severe with adaptation. However, cell mediated immunity was compromised, which makes animals susceptible to invading pathogens. This research identified adaptive responses to fescue toxicosis that highlighted shifts in immune function.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical references (pages 167-180).eng
dc.format.extent1 online resource (xii, 188 pages) : illustrationseng
dc.identifier.oclc900609293eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/44858
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/44858eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjectAnimal Scienceseng
dc.titleEffects of heat stress and fescue toxicosis on the immune system and other physiological parameterseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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