Artifacts is a refereed journal of undergraduate work in rhetoric and composition at the University of Missouri. The journal celebrates writing in all its forms by inviting student authors to submit projects composed across different genres and media. Artifacts seeks to promote a public exchange of ideas by providing MU students with audiences outside their own classrooms. Please note that all links provided in the articles were current at the time the article was placed in MOspace.

Recent Submissions

  • A Journey to Other Worlds 

    Miller, Daniel (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    In the following paper, [the author intends] to define the well documented astral projection legend, and then compare and contrast variants of the legend found around the world.
  • Hannibal, MO: “America’s Hometown” Amidst Fictional Landscape 

    Marschka, Lindsey (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    In order to fully appreciate the scope of our surroundings, we must look to and describe different views of the same scene throughout history, detailing what composes this view and why these stages are necessary in foreseeing ...
  • The Phenomenon of Impulse Buying 

    Mendenhall, Cole (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    For many people, impulsiveness can be intuitive by nature. Impulsiveness can be related to their personality, low-inhibitions, external factors or all of the above. To an extent, this can be common and not harmful, but ...
  • Evaluation of electronic medical record implementation and patient satisfaction 

    Corwin, Brianna (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    Computers and electronic medical records are widely used by clinicians in ambulatory settings. Indeed, both the United States federal government and the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom have recently ...
  • The Trouble with Princes 

    Eshelman, Amanda (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    Amanda Eshelman decided to write about The Prince in her Middle Ages and Renaissance class primarily because she hated it a lot. This is her attempt at a reasonable justification for bashing a centuries old classic and an ...
  • The Cropsey Maniac 

    Vitale, Meredith (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    The story of the Cropsey Maniac exemplifies a legend used at summer camp to reinforce what is expected of the group. The Cropsey legend is local to New York, and often New York City children are sent to camp during the ...
  • Polytheism in Early Africa 

    McCandless, Tighe (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    Much of the subject matter regarding religion in early Africa seems alien to someone living in the modern Western world. Everything has its own explanation and cause in nature. We still fear things like the flu, earthquakes, ...
  • Oy Vey! The Jewish Golem and The X-Files 

    Simpson, Riley (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    Riley Simpson was curious about golems, so he asked his friend Peter, an X-Files superfan, to recommend a golem-themed episode of his favorite show. Peter recommended one, but as Riley looked at the episodes on Netflix, ...
  • How to Live a Life 

    Donovan, Sean (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    Sean Donovan wrote this paper for Middle Ages and Renaissance Humanities Sequence class, responding to a prompt on how different works from this time period address the subject of how people can best live their life.
  • Elijah’s Inferno 

    Solidum, Elijah (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    Elijah Solidum chose to write “Elijah’s Inferno” because he had read Dante’s Inferno in class that semester, and he wanted to put a personal and more modern spin on Dante’s masterpiece. He tried to keep Dante’s general ...
  • Care for life? The failing system of nursing home care in the United States 

    Fisher, Maura (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    The phrase “respect your elders” is ingrained in most minds at a young age. This phrase, however, has been lost somewhere. A lack of respect for the elderly is especially present in the quality of health care they receive. ...
  • Divine Matrix (Editor's introduction) 

    Omar, Youssif Zaghwani (University of Missouri, The Campus Writing Program, 2014)
    According to Braden, Divine Matrix is “the container that holds the universe, the bridge between all things, and the mirror that shows us what we have created”.
  • Artifacts Issue 11 (2014) Contents page 

    (University of Missouri, 2014)
    This is the online journal Artifacts, Issue 11 (2014).