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dc.contributor.advisorWhites, LeeAnnen
dc.contributor.authorBeilein, Joseph M.en_US
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri
dc.coverage.spatialMissouri -- Little Dixie Region
dc.coverage.temporal1800-1899en_US
dc.coverage.temporal1861-1865en_US
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summeren
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (May 18, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- History.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the roles of all participants in the guerrilla war who favored the South in the Civil War in Missouri. The primary sources used to accurately assess these roles were primarily the statements and witness testimony found in the Union Provost Marshals' File of Papers Relating to Individual Citizens. Other key research materials were Federal Censuses for specific Missouri counties in the decades leading up to the war and The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies. Using these three sources presented very different perspectives and helped to paint a new picture of an old conflict. The major results of this study are related to the role of women and also the importance of a pre-war worldview on the way that men and women fought the war together. First, southern sympathizing women were not coerced into supporting the guerrillas but did so willingly and were capable of organizing their labor without a male overseer. Second, the labor of women created the necessary materials for the war. Third, the social connections formed between households provided the basis for an informal supply line that operated during the war. Lastly, the guerrillas' tactics and strategies were the byproduct of community construction and protection.en_US
dc.identifier.other.b58536486en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4512
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2006 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2006 Theses
dc.subject.lcshGuerrillas -- Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshGuerrilla warfare -- Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshLittle Dixie Region (Mo.) -- Historyen_US
dc.subject.lcshMissouri -- Historyen_US
dc.title"The presence of these families is the cause of the presence there of the guerrillas": the influence of Little Dixie households on the Civil War in Missourien_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic booksen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic dissertationsen_US
dc.type.genreFreely available online resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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