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dc.contributor.advisorSmith, Zoeeng
dc.contributor.authorJune-Friesen, Katyeng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited States
dc.coverage.temporal2004en_US
dc.date.issued2006
dc.date.submitted2006 Summeren
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (June 26, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how the print media used references to music to indicate "red state" and "blue state" identity during the 2004 presidential campaign. Through a textual analysis of more than 30 newspaper and magazine articles, it analyzes how print media employed sound representations or references to music to connote voter identity and regional culture. Bringing together cultural theory, sound theory and visual theory, this thesis investigates how sound representations, like images, work to shape and reflect cultural ideologies in media. The primary investigation is how references to sound in print media work to construct and reconstitute identity. Specifically, this research looks at the media's employment of musical references to the "cultural divide" and how music became an extension of political beliefs. It explores how campaigns and media used rock and country music genres to represent geographic regions and cultural values. Further, it explains how both genres have become aligned with certain politics depending on historical and political moments. By analyzing how print articles discussed campaigns, musical genres and musicians' political actions, this research works to dissect the representations of red and blue America with which we have become so familiar.eng
dc.identifier.other.b58876984en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4517
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2006 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2006 Theses
dc.subject.lcshMass media -- Political aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshSound in mass mediaen_US
dc.subject.lcshPresidents -- Election -- Press coverageen_US
dc.subject.lcshJournalism -- Political aspectsen_US
dc.subject.lcshPatriotic musicen_US
dc.subject.lcshPopular musicen_US
dc.titleThe sounds of red and blue America: dissecting musical references to "red state" and "blue state" identity in print media during the 2004 presidental campaignen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic booksen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic dissertationsen_US
dc.type.genreFreely available online resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalismen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalismeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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