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dc.contributor.advisorHouseman, Richard M.eng
dc.contributor.authorPhipps, Sarah J.eng
dc.coverage.spatialMissourieng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 27, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Entomology.eng
dc.description.abstractGrasslands are an endangered ecosystem. Unfortunately, few studies monitoring the health of these grasslands have included arthropods, thus leaving out a vital biodiversity component. Ants have been proven to be reliable indicators of restoration success in some habitats. Literature regarding the benefits of ants in ecosystems is abundant; however, studies examining ant grassland ecology are limited. The availability of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land of different ages allowed us to examine differences in ant diversity (richness and abundance), species composition, and functional groups at different times since being restored as grasslands. Four sampling techniques were utilized (pitfall traps, litter samples, hand collection, and soil core sampling) on four different ages (0, 3, 7-8, 14-16 yrs) of grassland in east-central Missouri. Efficacy of sampling methods was also examined. A total of 18,743 ants were collected, representing 28 species in 16 genera. Ants were most abundant in older ages of CRP land. Species richness peaked in 7-8 yr fields. Some species showed patterns of being either early colonizers, late colonizers, or present in all field ages. The functional groups Cold Climate Specialists, Opportunists, Cryptic species, and Generalized Myrmicines (in descending order) dominated CRP land. Pitfall traps were the most effective sampling method. The results of this study provide baseline information on how ants establish on restored grassland in the CRP and provide information for future comparative studies.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb59447965eng
dc.identifier.oclc166329236eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4538
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4538eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshConservation Reserve Program (U.S.)eng
dc.subject.lcshAntseng
dc.subject.lcshEndangered ecosystemseng
dc.subject.lcshGrassland conservationeng
dc.subject.lcshGrasslandseng
dc.titleBiodiversity of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in restored grasslands of different ageseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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