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dc.contributor.advisorKitchen, Newell R. (Newell Ray)eng
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Darrin F.eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (June 26, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Agronomy.eng
dc.description.abstractNitrogen (N) fertilizer unused by the crop is left to the fate of the processes of the N cycle, and can eventually lead to nitrate contamination of surface and ground waters. In order to address this problem, various methods have been used to try to account for spatial variability of N within agricultural fields. One approach to account for this variability and thereby reduce nitrate pollution is in-season site-specific N application according to economic optimal N rate (EONR). Recently, active-light reflectance sensors have been tested for mid-season, on-the-go N fertilizer application in corn. This 2004 and 2005 study was conducted on 12 Missouri producer corn fields to (1) evaluate the relationship between EONR and active-light reflectance sensor readings, and (2) evaluate the relationship between environmental measurements and EONR. Measurements included EONR, crop N yield efficiency (YE), N fertilizer recovery efficiency (NFRE), and post-harvest soil inorganic N levels. In 2004, EONR was significantly related to active-light sensor indices, but with regression model coefficients of determination (r[superscript 2]) [less than or equal to] 0.35 for all sensor indices evaluated. Prediction of EONR improved (r[superscript 2] = 0.47) when soil electrical conductivity was added to the model. A relationship between EONR and the indices could not be established for 2005 data. In 2004, YE at EONR was not the same between fields, and ranged from 19-47 kg grain (kg N)-1. As N rate approached EONR, both YE and NFRE declined, while post-harvest inorganic N levels increased. These preliminary results show promise for using active-light reflectance sensors to achieve EONR and reduce N loss off fields.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb58877915eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4544
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subjecteconomic optimal N rate (EONR)eng
dc.subjecteconomic optimal N rate (EONR)eng
dc.subject.lcshNitrogen fertilizers -- Controleng
dc.subject.lcshSoils -- Nitrogen contenteng
dc.subject.lcshNitrogen in agricultureeng
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental impact analysiseng
dc.subject.lcshCorn -- Growtheng
dc.titleAn environmental assessment of sensor-based variable-rate nitrogen management in corneng
dc.typeThesiseng
dc.type.genreElectronic bookseng
dc.type.genreElectronic dissertationseng
dc.type.genreFreely available online resourceseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAgronomy (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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