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dc.contributor.advisorMerrill, Denniseng
dc.contributor.authorFrench, Patrickeng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Falleng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on June 15, 2015eng
dc.descriptionThesis advisor: Dennis Merrilleng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (pages 29-34)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.)--Department of History. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2014eng
dc.description.abstractFrances Perkins was the United States Secretary of Labor from 1933-1945, yet she has received little attention from historians. There are countless works that study President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s years in office, but Perkins’ achievements have yet to enter the mainstream debate of New Deal scholarship. Perkins did not “assist” with the New Deal; she became one of the chief architects of its legislation and a champion of organized labor. Ever mindful of her progressive mentor, Florence Kelley, Perkins stared her reform work at Jane Addams’ Hull House in Chicago. By the end of FDR’s tenure as president, the forty-hour workweek became standard, child labor was abolished, and she was instrumental in the work-relief programs under the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA), the popular Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and most notably Section 7a of the National Industrial Recovery Administration that allowed for collective bargaining for organized labor. FDR’s controversial appointment marked the first time a female had attained such a powerful position in government, and she wrestled with cross-sections of class, gender, and ethnicity during her tenure as FDR’s Labor Secretary.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsHumble beginnings -- Cabinet appointment -- New Deal architecture -- Conclusioneng
dc.format.extentix, 35 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/45622eng
dc.subject.lcshPerkins, Frances, 1880-1965eng
dc.subject.lcshNew Deal, 1933-1939eng
dc.subject.lcshUnited States -- Politics and government -- 1933-1945eng
dc.subject.lcshUnited States--Economic policy--1933-1945eng
dc.subject.lcshWomen in public life -- United Stateseng
dc.subject.otherThesis -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Historyeng
dc.titleThe Ghost in the Machine: Frances Perkins’ Refusal to Accept Marginalizationeng
thesis.degree.disciplineHistory (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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