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dc.contributor.advisorMason, Debra L.eng
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Vicki Knaseleng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Falleng
dc.description.abstractShortly after Joseph Smith founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the group left its New York roots in search of space to practice their faith in peace. They moved to Missouri in 1831, settling near Independence and Liberty. But conflict rose between the newcomers and those already settled in the area, leading to violence and death. This study examined how selected commercial and religious newspapers represented Mormons and the conflict that ultimately ended when Gov. Lilburn Boggs issued Executive Order #44, which forced the Mormons from the state. Textual analysis drew out five themes -- theology, politics and patriotism, theocracy, legal processes and First Amendment rights, and war and conflict -- while showing how the selected commercial newspapers portrayed Mormons, how the selected religious newspapers portrayed Mormons, how the selected newspapers portrayed the conflict, how coverage differed between general circulation and religious newspapers, and if and how coverage differed among the faith-based papers.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/45657
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.sourceSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.titleThemes in and comparison of selected newspaper coverage of the Mormon Conflict in Missouri, 1831-1839eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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