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dc.contributor.advisorVanPool, Toddeng
dc.contributor.authorWillhite, Brenton E.eng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014eng
dc.description.abstractThe prehispanic North American Southwest was characterized by widespread agriculture in an arid environment. These people leaned heavily upon stone tools to carry out their daily lives, and an analysis of flaked stone artifacts can provide insights into the role(s) that flaked stone served. Thousands of flaked stone artifacts have been recovered from the 76 Draw Site in Luna County, New Mexico. These artifacts were analyzed with regard to several variables in order to discern the means by which people reduced stone in the past. These data suggest that the inhabitants of 76 Draw reduced locally available material through an expedient process known as generalized core reduction. In addition, intra-site variation within the assemblage indicates the presence of spatially separate reduction areas. Finally, a comparison of the 76 Draw flaked stone assemblage to several Medio Period Casas Grandes sites reflects the degree to which inhabitants of 76 Draw reduced stone in a manner similar to their neighbors to the South.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/45715
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.source.originalSubmitted by University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.titleStone tool production in the Medio periphery : analysis of debitage from the 76 draw site (LA 156980)eng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng


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