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dc.contributor.advisorPintel, Davideng
dc.contributor.authorFasina, Olufemieng
dc.date.issued2014eng
dc.date.submitted2014 Springeng
dc.descriptionAbstract from public.pdf.eng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Viruses as obligate intracellular metabolic parasite require the capacity to orchestrate and modulate the host environment either in the nucleus or cytoplasm for their efficient reproductive life cycle. This warrants the use of diverse range of proteins expressed from the viral genome with the ability of regulating viral genome replication, transcription and translation, in addition antagonizing host factors inhibitory to the virus. Therefore, in order to achieve these goals, viruses utilizes gene expression strategies to expand their coding capacity. Gene expression mechanism such as transcription initiation, capping, splicing and 3�-end processing afford viruses the opportunities to utilize the eukaryotic metabolic machineries for generating proteome diversity. Parvoviruses and other DNA viruses effectively capitalize on their use of nuclear eukaryotic metabolic machineries to co-opt host cell factors for optimal replication and gene expression. Parvoviruses with small genome size and overlapping open reading frames utilize alternative transcription initiation, alternative splicing and alternative polyadenylation to co-ordinate the expression of its non-structural and structural proteins. In this work, we have characterized how two parvoviruses; Dependovirus AAV5 and Bocavirus Minute virus of canine (MVC) utilize alternative gene expression mechanisms and strategies to optimize expression of viral proteins from their genome.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/45905
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations.eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campuses of the University of Missouri.eng
dc.sourceSubmitted by the University of Missouri--Columbia Graduate School.eng
dc.subject.FASTRNAeng
dc.subject.FASTViruseseng
dc.subject.FASTEukaryotic cellseng
dc.subject.FASTMicrobiologyeng
dc.titleAlternative translation and alternative RNA processing mechanism in parvovirus RNA processingeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology (Medicine) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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