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dc.contributor.advisorPearsall, Deborah M.en
dc.contributor.advisorPearsall, Deborah M.en
dc.coverage.spatialBolivia -- Tiwanaku Site
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Summeren
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on April 21, 2009)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Anthropology.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis employs microfossil data to add to our understanding of three factors (agricultural intensification, ritual, and trade) viewed as critical in the development of the Tiwanaku state during the preceding Formative period (1500 BC-AD 400). Comparative plant, and archaeological soil and artifact residue samples were analyzed in order to address the role of local subsistence plants, hallucinogenic and exotic species, and maize at four sites (Chiripa, Kala Uyni, Sonaje, and Kumi Kipa) located on the Taraco Peninsula in the Lake Titicaca basin (Bolivia). Evidence for local subsistence crops and hallucinogenic plants was constrained by a lack of available diagnostic phytoliths, but exotic plant indicators were uncovered in archaeological samples. Current phytolith methods for identifying maize were tested against the local flora, and a new method for maize identification was developed. Maize was discovered in artifact residues and soil samples, providing the earliest evidence for this crop in this region.en_US
dc.identifier.other.b66822324en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4596
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2006 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2006 Theses
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural intensificationen_US
dc.subject.lcshHallucinogenic plantsen_US
dc.subject.lcshCornen_US
dc.subject.lcshPhytolithsen_US
dc.titleThe application of phytolith and starch grain analysis to understanding formative period subsistence, ritual, and trade on the Taraco Pennisula, Highland Boliviaen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic booksen_US
dc.type.genreElectronic dissertationsen_US
dc.type.genreFreely available online resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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