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dc.contributor.advisorBush, Hannah E.eng
dc.contributor.authorBush, Hannah E.eng
dc.date.issued2012eng
dc.date.submitted2012 Summereng
dc.descriptionDissertationeng
dc.description.abstract[ACCESS RESTRICTED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI AT AUTHOR'S REQUEST.] Adult women in the community experience a range of problematic relationships with food and their bodies. This is demonstrated in the high prevalence of obesity and overweight, disordered eating, and body image dissatisfaction. Existing interventions targeting these issues are limited in scope and targeted population.More holistic interventions that meet the range of needs of adult women in the community are needed. This study examines the efficacy of one such intervention, called Eat for Life. The Eat for Life program combines two innovative paradigms, intuitive eating and mindful eating, to help women develop a positive relationship with food and their bodies. The study hypothesized that participants in the Eat for Life program would demonstrate significantly better outcomes on a range of eating and weight-related measures than those in a wait-list control group. Results demonstrated that at post-10 weeks, Eat for Life participants demonstrated significantly greater scores on intuitive eating, mindfulness, and body appreciation and significantly lower scores on disordered eating than those in the wait-list group. Results also found mindfulness to serve as a partial mechanism of the significant differences between groups on the other measures. These findings have implications for the positive effects of intuitive and mindful eating in the treatment of a range of eating and weight-related issues.eng
dc.format.extentpageseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/46095
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsAccess is limited to the campus of the University of Missouri--Columbia.eng
dc.subject.FASTFood habitseng
dc.subject.FASTEating disorders in womeneng
dc.subject.FASTEmployee health promotioneng
dc.subject.FASTBody image in womeneng
dc.titleEat for life : a quasi-experimental trial of a novel mindfulness-based intuitive eating interventioneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational, school and counseling psychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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