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dc.contributor.advisorLyman, R. Leeen
dc.contributor.authorDeForest, David Scotten_US
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Fallen
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 22, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Anthropology.en_US
dc.description.abstractObjective information concerning "lithic sound's" properties of pitch, duration, and intensity, can inform archaeologists about a stone's candidacy for human use, and whether or not lithic material at a site has been heat treated. A hammer stone machine held and struck specimens under controlled conditions. To process acoustic information, A Kay Computer Speech Laboratory and related software proved effective. Nineteen specimens of stone were tested. Based upon waveform evaluation, heat treated stone had much higher average sound intensity levels than the stone in its unheated condition. Archaeologists could use methods discussed in this study to assess if heat treated siliceous rock is present at sites. After being struck with a hammer stone, significant differences existed concerning the duration and average vibration rates of sound between types of stone, unheated versus heated stone, and high and low quality stone of the same type. Accessory information included observation of how the hammer stone rebounded differently from specimens with obvious flaws, compared to stones with no imperfections. The hammer rebounded farther after striking high quality rock. Knappers use their sense of proprioception to determine a stone's candidacy for reduction. When striking a core stone which will flake predictably, the hand holding the hammer, will rebound quicker and farther back, compared to a low quality stone which absorbs energy.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b59443169en_US
dc.identifier.oclc166261978en_US
dc.identifier.otherDeforestD-121106-T6048en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4614
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2006 Freely available theses (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2006 Theses
dc.subject.lcshRocks -- Acoustic propertiesen_US
dc.subject.lcshRocks -- Heat treatmenten_US
dc.titleAssessing "lithic sound" to predict a rock's ease of flakingen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US


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