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dc.contributor.advisorNilon, Charles H., 1956-eng
dc.contributor.authorBrunet, Donna A.eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 22, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.S.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife.eng
dc.description.abstractButterflies are considered to be good indicators of a healthy environment and reflect the environmental impact of urban development. The popularity of butterflies with the general public and declining butterfly populations, combined with the fact that lawns now occupy more than 12 million hectares in the United States, make a compelling case for a systematic survey of garden butterflies. This study looked at which species occur in Columbia, Missouri and which nectar sources they use. In addition, surveys examined the attitudes of people toward butterflies and other insects. We also looked at the impact of different lawn maintenance regimes on attracting butterflies to yards. We recruited volunteers to count butterflies in their yards once a week for 15 minutes from May through September 2002 and 2003. Volunteers observed most of the butterfly species expected in mid-Missouri. In addition to identifying and counting butterflies, they recorded the flowers on which any butterflies landed. Based on a literature search, flower genera were categorized as "recommended" or "not recommended" for use in butterfly gardens. Approximately 90% of the butterflies that were observed on flowers each year were on genera typically recommended for use in flower gardens. Genera most heavily used included Asclepias, Buddleja, Coreopsis, Echinacea, Eupatorium, Liatris, Rudbeckia, Salvia, Sedum, Tagetes, Trifolium / Melilotus / Medicago, Verbena, Zinnia. Yards in which homeowners tolerated a more "weedy" appearance had both more butterflies and more species per count.eng
dc.identifier.merlin.b59442074eng
dc.identifier.oclc166254061eng
dc.identifier.otherBrunetD-120506-T6166eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4624eng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollection2006 Freely available theses (MU)eng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2006 Theseseng
dc.subject.lcshButterfly gardeningeng
dc.subject.lcshButterfly gardenseng
dc.titleButterfly gardening: using volunteers to provide data on flower useeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineFisheries and wildlife sciences (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.S.eng


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