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dc.contributor.advisorBartholow, Bruce D. (Bruce Dale), 1970-eng
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Erika A.eng
dc.date.issued2006eng
dc.date.submitted2006 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on August 23, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Psychology.eng
dc.description.abstractAwareness of one's own mortality can increase prejudice-related attitudes, behavior, and aggression against members of outgroups (e.g., Arndt et al., 1997; McGregor et al., 1998; Lieberman et al., 1999). The current research investigates the neurocognitive processes underlying person perception following a mortality salience induction that might be associated with these forms of outgroup bias. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were used to observe attentional and evaluative processes on-line as White participants categorized ingroup (White) and outgroup (Black) faces according to expression (happy vs. angry) following either mortality salience (MS) induction or a control manipulation. In Study 1, MS led to an overall increase in the P300 for all stimuli, suggesting that MS may cause a state of heightened perceptual processing. In addition, the analyses of the N2 means showed that this component was larger in the MS condition than the control condition, specifically for White faces. This finding suggests that rather than intensifying outgroup bias MS may instead be enhancing an already present in group bias. Study 2 included additional outgroup targets (Asians). Results showed again that MS led to an overall increase in the P300 component. Taken together, these results begin to highlight the potential role played by the psychological state of death awareness on influencing the cognitive processing of outgroup members.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb59444009eng
dc.identifier.oclc166268631eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4634
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4634eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshPrejudiceseng
dc.subject.lcshAwarenesseng
dc.subject.lcshMortality and raceeng
dc.subject.lcshAggressivenesseng
dc.titleDeath, prejudice, and ERP's: understanding the neural correlates of biaseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelMasterseng
thesis.degree.nameM.A.eng


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