Obesity: a growing concern about fetal nutrition

MOspace/Manakin Repository

Breadcrumbs Navigation

Obesity: a growing concern about fetal nutrition

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4636

[-] show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor vom Saal, Frederick S. en
dc.contributor.author Coe, Benjamin Lloyd, 1981- en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-12T17:49:32Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-12T17:49:32Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2006 Spring en
dc.identifier.other CoeB-050506-T5202 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4636
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file viewed on (February 6, 2007) en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Thesis (M.A.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2006. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Biological sciences. en_US
dc.description.abstract Obesity is a growing epidemic and a major health concern in the United States and elsewhere. The Fetal Basis of Adult Disease (FBAD) theory holds that events that occur during development can permanently alter gene expression throughout the lifetime of the individual. A link has emerged between fetal nutrition, birth weight, and metabolic profile in adulthood. Metabolic diseases represent a host of conditions relating to abnormal "programming" of nutrient management. We have developed a CD-1 mouse model which shows that fetuses within two body weight ranges at birth are at increased risk for developing metabolic diseases such as obesity, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and Type II diabetes. It is not just individuals that are born with abnormally high birth weights (macrosomia) that are at risk for becoming overweight later in life. Paradoxically, this risk also applies for individuals who are born with extremely low birth weights, which are termed intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR). Mice identified with IUGR at birth show a dramatic increase in body weight during the first week post-weaning, which results in adult obesity and an altered metabolic profile for the remainder of their adult life. Preliminary studies indicate that when examined in adulthood, adipocytes in males identified with IUGR or macrosomia at birth showed evidence of differences in "programming" of expression of genes involved in fat cell differentiation and function. Certain xenoestrogens in the environment are known to interrupt the process of cell differentiation. Utilizing this model, we will be able to test the effects of these chemicals on individuals that already have a metabolic deficit. By examining the relationship of fetal nutrition and growth with endocrine disruption, greater evidence may emerge for the need of regulation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.relation.ispartof 2006 Freely available theses (MU) en_US
dc.subject endocrine disrupting chemicals. en_US
dc.subject endocrine disrupting chemicals en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Obesity en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Metabolism -- Disorders en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Fetus -- Development en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Fetus -- Growth en_US
dc.title Obesity: a growing concern about fetal nutrition en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Biological sciences en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name M.A. en_US
thesis.degree.level Masters en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b57710417 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Theses. 2006 Theses


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] show simple item record