[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorThompson, Carolyn (Carolyn Joy), 1948-eng
dc.contributor.authorWelchert, Tammy S.eng
dc.date.issued2015-08-04eng
dc.date.submitted2015 Summereng
dc.descriptionTitle from PDF of title page, viewed on August 10, 2015eng
dc.descriptionDissertation advisor: Carolyn J. Thompsoneng
dc.descriptionVitaeng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographic references (pages 238-249)eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.)--School of Education. University of Missouri--Kansas City, 2015eng
dc.description.abstractA review of STEM literature indicates that increased attention is being paid to STEM initiatives particularly with K-12 teachers and programs designed to foster interest in STEM fields at the secondary education level, both of which feed the STEM pipeline. The President of the United States, Barack Obama, Presidents of Higher Education Institutions, and an increased global awareness of the shortfall of workers in the STEM pipeline are driving the increased attention. Recognition that an inability to meet STEM workforce demands may jeopardize the position of the United States as a world leader is significant. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of a first year experience course, Biology 115: First Year Seminar, specifically with regards to academic performance and retention, and to evaluate how the impact changes when course instruction was delivered in a 16-week versus an 8-week model. Three sample groups (N = 596) consisting of first time college freshmen declared as biology majors from 2005-2012 at the University of Missouri-Kansas City were selected for participation. Data was collected from student’s high school and college transcripts and college applications by the Office of Institutional Research. A three phase analysis including descriptive statistics and t-tests, principle component analysis, and binary logistic regression were performed using a hierarchical model informed by Alexander Astins’ Input-Environment-Output model. The majority of students were female, residents of the State of Missouri, and White. Analysis results indicated that students enrolled in the Biology 115 course earned higher grade point averages, were in better academic standing, and were retained at a higher level than the control group. Additionally, students enrolled in the course in the 8-Week model earned higher grade point averages and had higher retention from Year 1 to Year 2 and retention as biology majors over the 16-week model.eng
dc.description.tableofcontentsIntroduction -- Literature review -- Methodology -- Analysis -- Discussion -- Appendix A. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix B. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix C. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix D. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix E. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix F. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix G. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendix H. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrix -- Appendox I. Principle Component Analysis Control Sample Pre-College Variable Correlation Matrixeng
dc.format.extentxiv, 251 pageseng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/46454eng
dc.subject.lcshScience -- Study and teachingeng
dc.subject.lcshTechnology -- Study and teachingeng
dc.subject.lcshEngineering -- Study and teachingeng
dc.subject.lcshMathematics -- Study and teachingeng
dc.subject.lcshCollege freshmeneng
dc.subject.otherDissertation -- University of Missouri--Kansas City -- Educationeng
dc.titleAn Examination of the Impact of a First Year Experience Course on STEM Persistenceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineUrban Leadership and Policy Studies in Education (UMKC)eng
thesis.degree.disciplineCurriculum and Instruction (UMKC)
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Kansas Cityeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh.D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record