[-] Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorPorter, Michael J.eng
dc.contributor.authorPillion, Owen L.eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on March 19, 2009)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph.D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation looks at queer representation in the media and highlights a particular representational strategy that is used in a stereotypical fashion. My first chapter does two things. First, it centers on an exemplar to anchor a discussion regarding the substance and ubiquity of the image of queer affluence. Second, I provide context for the image by pointing to the tenuous status of GLTB issues in politics at the same time popular media is expanding its repertoire of GLTB images. The crux of Chapter Two, in addition to reviewing scholarly work, is to argue that queer representations are cumulative over time. The assumption is important because that quality provides the rationale for looking at selected images at particular times in order to understand images that came later. With that assumption in place, Chapter Three examines the construction of Leopold and Loeb as an early exemplar of queer affluence that was then recycled in the films noir of the 1940s and 1950s. I look at the construction of the queer men in these films and chart their relation to the stereotype of queer affluence seen in television programming today. In Chapter Four, I analyze queer celebrity spokespeople, figures that I believe are intertextually related to all the images that came before them. Finally, I conclude by painting queer affluence as a representational strategy that is deeply invested in both maintaining sexual differences and assimilating the affluent queer into mainstream culture at the same time minimizing any hints of radical politics and leaving many non-affluent queers behind.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb66663751eng
dc.identifier.oclc316524860eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4661eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4661
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshMass media and gayseng
dc.subject.lcshGays in motion pictureseng
dc.subject.lcshStereotypes (Social psychology) in mass mediaeng
dc.subject.lcshTranssexualseng
dc.subject.lcshBisexualseng
dc.titleQueer affluence, popular media, and the matter of the openly gay spokespersoneng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunication (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


Files in this item

[PDF]
[PDF]
[PDF]

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

[-] Show simple item record