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dc.contributor.advisorOkker, Patriciaeng
dc.contributor.authorBlock, Shelley R., 1974-eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on January 29, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- English.eng
dc.description.abstractAlthough historically scholars have viewed nineteenth-century temperance as a lesser movement in a century characterized by other weighty reforms, this dissertation builds on recent scholarship that redirects attention to the multi-faceted nature of women's temperance work as it coalesced women for important cultural work. Just as the women's temperance movement as a whole has suffered from critical neglect, so too have the literary productions of temperance women. In this work, I analyze how - despite the characteristic sentimental, generic stereotypes often associated with temperance literature -nineteenth-century female authors of temperance literature did in fact utilize this genre to respond to a wide array of social and political concerns. For Lydia Sigourney, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Rebecca Harding Davis and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, the temperance issue does not stand alone; my work illuminates how to various degrees and in diverse ways, temperance is intimately connected with topics such as women's concerns, community, capitalism and reform among a host of other pertinent social topics.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61974110eng
dc.identifier.oclc191685218eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4675
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4675eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshSigourney, L. H. (Lydia Howard), 1791-1865eng
dc.subject.lcshHarper, Frances Ellen Watkins, 1825-1911eng
dc.subject.lcshDavis, Rebecca Harding, 1831-1910eng
dc.subject.lcshPhelps, Elizabeth Stuart, 1844-1911eng
dc.subject.lcshWoman's Christian Temperance Unioneng
dc.subject.lcshTemperance in literatureeng
dc.titleNineteenth-century literary women and the temperance tradition: temperance rhetoric in the fiction of Lydia Sigourney, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Rebecca Harding Davis and Elizabeth Stuart Phelpseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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