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dc.contributor.authorDillender, Jordaneng
dc.date.issued2008-07eng
dc.description.abstractThe refusal to engage in a topic of discussion, thus breaking away from an expected flow of dialogue, is considered an example of rhetorical refusal. Author John Schilb explores this matter in his book, Rhetorical Refusals: Defying Audiences' Expectations. While the hypothetical situation presented above offers a very general image of rhetorical refusals, and Schilb makes it clear that there are different types, it serves to illustrate the very basic definition of the term, which also serves as the subtitle of the book: defying audiences' expectations.eng
dc.identifier.citationArtifacts ; issue 01 (2008)eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/469eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherRhetoric and Composition Program, University of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Department of Englisheng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesArtifacts ; issue 01 (2008)eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.subjectJohn Schilb, 1952-eng
dc.subjectrhetorical refusaleng
dc.subjectaudience expectationeng
dc.titleAn unspoken tool : review of John Schilb's Rhetorical Refusalseng
dc.typeArticleeng


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