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dc.contributor.advisorGeary, David C.eng
dc.contributor.authorVigil, Jacob Miguel, 1976-eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 10, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstractChildren and young adults between the ages of 11-21 years that were displaced by Hurricane Katrina and currently living in a large relocation camp (n = 68) were compared to a sample of demographically matched controls (n = 63) on two measures of physiological distress (salivary cortisol and alpha-amylase, AA), and self-reported symptoms of distress, depression, anxiety, aggression, self-evaluations, self-esteem, and life-satisfaction. The Katrina sample reported lower anxiety and showed lower cortisol levels than the controls. Similarly, females reported lower anxiety and showed lower cortisol levels than males. Multivariate regressions showed that hurricane experience and sex moderated the relations between cortisol and AA and many internalizing and externalizing behaviors, including aggression and symptoms of depression and distress. In general, salivary cortisol and AA were differentially related to distress behaviors in males and females, suggesting a dynamic interplay between normative sex differences in multiple components of psycho-physiological arousal and behavioral manifestation of internalizing and externalizing behaviors. The findings are interpreted from a broad socio-relational framework of social behavior, which suggests that the human stress response system may have evolved, in part, to modulate the formation and maintenance of different types of social relationships. If so, then phenotypic variation in the expression of distress behaviors such as aggression and depression may change with changes in condition of the individual, including recent life-experiences and sex-typical social interaction styles.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb60110831eng
dc.identifier.oclc173997212eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4704eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4704
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshStress in childreneng
dc.subject.lcshStress in adolescenceeng
dc.subject.lcshRefugees -- Psychologyeng
dc.subject.lcshHurricane Katrina, 2005eng
dc.titleSex differences in the stress responses of children affected by hurricane Katrinaeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychology (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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