Habitat use and home range of American bitterns (Botuarus lentiginosus) and monitoring of inconspicuous marsh birds in northwest Minnesota

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Habitat use and home range of American bitterns (Botuarus lentiginosus) and monitoring of inconspicuous marsh birds in northwest Minnesota

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dc.contributor.advisor Fredrickson, Leigh H. en
dc.contributor.author Lor, Socheata K., 1968- en_US
dc.coverage.spatial Minnesota
dc.date.accessioned 2010-01-12T18:40:45Z
dc.date.available 2010-01-12T18:40:45Z
dc.date.issued 2007 en_US
dc.date.submitted 2007 Fall en
dc.identifier.other LorS-113007-D8764 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10355/4705
dc.description The entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file. en_US
dc.description Title from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on February 15, 2008) en_US
dc.description Includes bibliographical references. en_US
dc.description Vita. en_US
dc.description Thesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007. en_US
dc.description Dissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Fisheries and wildlife. en_US
dc.description.abstract Information on habitat use of the American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus) and a statistically valid survey design for monitoring changes in populations of inconspicuous marsh birds, which include American and Least Bitterns (Ixobrychus exilis), Pied-billed Grebes (Podilymbus podiceps), Soras (Porzana carolina), and Virginia Rails (Rallus limicola)) is needed to inform conservation and management actions. My research, from 1999 - 2002, examined breeding habitat use and home range of American Bitterns. Also, I used pilot survey data to guide design options to meet objectives for monitoring marsh bird occupancy rates in association with habitat changes. Nest sites of American Bitterns in wetlands (n = 47) and grasslands (n = 33) were positively associated with percent dead vegetation cover and density and negatively associated with vegetation height. Foraging sites of American Bitterns were negatively associated with distance to small water openings and vegetation height. Daily survival rate was 0.96 (95% CI 0.930 - 0.979) and nest survival rate of American Bitterns was 0.35 (95% CI = 0.15 - 0.58). The average core home range size (50%) was 18.08 ha ([plus or minus] 6.38) and the 95% home range was 109.28 ha ([plus or minus] 38.47) using the fixed-kernel estimator. Results from occupancy analyses of pilot data and evaluation of a set of a priori candidate models provide the needed guidance for reliable marsh bird monitoring programs. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
dc.subject American Bitterns; Boturus lentiginosus. en_US
dc.subject American Bitterns; Boturus lentiginosus en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Nature conservation en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Bitterns -- Effect of habitat modification on en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Waterfowl -- Effect of habitat modification on en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Bitterns -- Nests en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Waterfowl -- Nests en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Bitterns -- Home range en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Waterfowl -- Home range en_US
dc.title Habitat use and home range of American bitterns (Botuarus lentiginosus) and monitoring of inconspicuous marsh birds in northwest Minnesota en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
thesis.degree.discipline Fisheries and wildlife sciences en_US
thesis.degree.grantor University of Missouri--Columbia en_US
thesis.degree.name Ph. D. en_US
thesis.degree.level Doctoral en_US
dc.identifier.merlin .b62018231 en_US
dc.identifier.oclc 192050520 en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunity University of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2007 Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartofcollection 2007 Freely available dissertations (MU)


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