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dc.contributor.authorHake, Stephanieeng
dc.date.issued2008eng
dc.description.abstractA collective appreciation for urban aesthetics during the 1960's-1970's jump-started the Hip-Hop movement which, at increasing speed throughout the decades since, has eventually come to dominate the majority of popular youth culture in America. Hip-Hop culture emerged as an attempt (whether conscious or not) by African Americans and Latinos to voice the social and economic oppression during the Civil Rights Movement through rap music, graffiti art, break dancing, and beat boxing. Popularity as a national culture has forced Hip-Hop to shed many of its distinctive goals to please Corporate America including adopting mainstream, capitalist values and adhering to patriarchal gender stereotypes. In her essay "Women, Rap, Wreck," Gwendolyn Pough explores women's assertion of wreck, which is, to Pough, Black female rappers radically contradicting popular expectations and standards to gain recognition in the Hip-Hop scene.eng
dc.identifier.citationArtifacts ; issue 01 (2008)eng
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/474eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherRhetoric and Composition Program, University of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. College of Arts and Sciences. Department of Englisheng
dc.relation.ispartofseriesArtifacts ; issue 01 (2008)eng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subjecturban aestheticseng
dc.subjectracismeng
dc.subjectexploitationeng
dc.subject.lcshHip-hop musiceng
dc.subject.lcshSexism in musiceng
dc.titleWreck or wrecked : sexism in contemporary hip-hop mediaeng
dc.typeArticleeng


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