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dc.contributor.advisorWilkins, Leeeng
dc.contributor.authorVultee, Fred, 1955-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summereng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on December 14, 2007)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Journalism.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation proposes a particular form of media framing effect from securitization, a process in which political actors seek to create consensus about security related issues such as terrorism and immigration by portraying them as imminent threats to a state's physical or cultural survival. The dissertation offers a two-stage model, in which securitization is first examined as an effect in news media accounts and then tested in an experiment as an effect of media accounts. A content analysis found that a salient example of securitization, the idea of a "war on terrorism", appeared as a consensual frame in distinct sectors of the media market after the September 2001 attacks. The frame diverged predictably in ensuing years, suggesting that the securitization frame changes in response to news organizations' sense of audience expectations and perceptions of the boundaries of political debate. The experimental portion found that securitization does not affect how accurately audiences comprehend the central point of a story but does appear to produce less attentive processing among those opposed to the government. The absence of securitization, on the other hand, appears to produce more attentive processing among those who consider themselves politically to the right of the media. Emotionally, the frame has no effect on opponents of the government but produces more trust in government among pro-government audiences and those to the right of the media.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb61523082eng
dc.identifier.oclc183889987eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4792
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4792eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshTerrorism and mass mediaeng
dc.subject.lcshFrames (Information theory)eng
dc.subject.lcshNational security -- Press coverageeng
dc.subject.lcshMass media -- Political aspectseng
dc.subject.lcshTerrorism -- Press coverageeng
dc.titleSecuritization as a theory of media effects: the contest over the framing of political violenceeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineJournalism (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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