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dc.contributor.advisorCritser, John Kennethen
dc.contributor.authorMullen, Steven Francis, 1968-en_US
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springen
dc.description"May 2007"en_US
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Veterinary pathobiology area program.en_US
dc.description.abstractHaving effective means to cryopreserve mammalian oocytes could increase the efficiency of managing populations of laboratory animals, increase the effectiveness of breeding programs for livestock, and improve the means by which assisted reproductive therapy is applied to human patients. Unfortunately, for most mammals oocyte cryopreservation suffers from inefficiencies. The work completed in this dissertation was directed at advancing our knowledge of the fundamental cryobiological properties of oocytes from cows, pigs, and humans. The first series of experiments was designed to determine the likelihood of damage to the metaphase II spindle from osmotic stress. Increasing levels of hypotonic and hypertonic stress resulted in an increased proportion of oocytes displaying a damaged spindle as assessed by immunocytochemical staining. Human oocytes appeared more sensitive to hypertonic stress compared to oocytes from cows and pigs. Hypotonic stress caused more damage to cow oocytes compared to human and pig oocytes. Pig oocytes were also shown to lose in vitro developmental potential, and the proportion damaged was greater compared to the proportion showing damage to the spindle. The permeability of mature human oocytes to ethylene glycol and water was also determined. It was shown that the permeability was temperature dependent. The results from the osmotic tolerance and membrane permeability studies for human oocytes was used to develop a theoretically-optimized procedure for vitrifying human oocytes in standard 0.25 cc straws.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b59291679en_US
dc.identifier.oclc163599419en_US
dc.identifier.otherMullenS-050107-D6356en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4804
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2007 Dissertations
dc.subject.lcshCryobiologyen_US
dc.subject.lcshOvum -- Cryopreservationen_US
dc.subject.lcshMammals -- Reproductionen_US
dc.titleAdvances in the fundamental cryobiology of mammalian oocytesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary pathobiology area programen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineVeterinary pathobiology area programeng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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