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dc.contributor.advisorBien, Joseph, 1936-eng
dc.contributor.authorNichols, Alan W., 1969-eng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on February 26, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Philosophy.eng
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I perform what I take to be a genealogy of governmentality by tracing the history of governmentality through various political philosophers and culminating in the work of Michel Foucault. I begin with some examination of governmentality as it appears in the discursive space opened by Foucault's later work, in particular his History of Sexuality, Vol. 1. I then turn to an examination of Plato and Aristotle, looking at how some contemporary interlocutors have been governmental in their approach. I conclude the first chapter with a look at ideology and historical explanation. Next, I examine Machiavelli's The Prince, also in light of some current interlocutors, particularly Foucault and John Najemy. The purpose here is to see how Machiavelli may well have presaged some governmental space in his work and how others have utilized this space. I also address the dispute between Foucault and Derrida over Descartes as well as Foucault's insight into authorship and show how this all relates to Machiavelli and The Prince. The final chapter looks at Hobbes and Locke's approaches to governance, particularly as they apply to the governance of nature. I continue the strategy of looking at current interlocutors, paying close attention to some contemporary commentary on Locke. I also look at the nature of historical explanation, in particular the approach that involves utilizing the "covering-law" models of explanation. I close with some thoughts on how this sort of explanation fails from a Foucauldian perspective.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb62218621eng
dc.identifier.oclc212156775eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4818
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4818eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.lcshFoucault, Michel, -- 1926-1984eng
dc.subject.lcshNeoliberalismeng
dc.subject.lcshBiopoliticseng
dc.subject.lcshPower (Philosophy)eng
dc.subject.lcshState, The -- Philosophyeng
dc.subject.lcshPolitical scienceeng
dc.titleOn Foucault and the genealogy of governmentalityeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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