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dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Charles Robert, 1958 June -eng
dc.contributor.authorBlaho, Victoria Alisoneng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Springeng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.eng
dc.description"May 2007"eng
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- microbiology (Medicine)eng
dc.description.abstractThe focus of my graduate studies was to determine the contribution of members of the eicosanoid cascade, namely the cyclooxygenase enzymes, to the regulation of experimental Lyme arthritis pathology. Using COX-2-specific inhibitors and knock-out animals, it was determined that COX-2 was not required for the development of Lyme arthritis, but played a prominent role in the resolution of arthritis pathology. Regulation of arthritis resolution by COX-2 was not mediated via alterations in antibody production or an inability to clear Borrelia from arthritic joints. Further pharmacological and knock-out studies found that COX-1 played a regulatory role during development of arthritis by maintaining a check on the developing inflammatory response. At later time points, COX-1 mediated down-regulation of the inflammatory response. The differential contribution of the COX isozymes to arthritis pathology during infection with B. burgdorferi lead to the characterization of a previously unappreciated role for COX-1 in the regulation of B lymphocyte responses and pathogen-specific antibody production using isozymes-specific inhibitors and COX-1 and -2 gene knock-out animals. Finally, the role of LTB4 in regulation of Lyme arthritis pathology was investigated using a BLT1-specific antagonist, and it was found that LTB4 may play a previously undescribed role in mediating the down-regulation of the inflammatory response to B. burgdorferi.eng
dc.identifier.merlinb66661985eng
dc.identifier.oclc316506230eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4819
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4819eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcollectionUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.subject.meshLyme Diseaseeng
dc.subject.meshCyclooxygenase 2 -- physiologyeng
dc.subject.meshInflammation -- metabolismeng
dc.subject.meshLeukotriene B4 -- metabolismeng
dc.subject.meshBorrelia burgdorferieng
dc.subject.meshArthritis, Infectious -- drug therapyeng
dc.subject.meshCyclooxygenase 1 -- physiologyeng
dc.titleLipid mediators in the development and resolution of experimental lyme arthritiseng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology (Medicine) (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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