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dc.contributor.advisorTownsend, Marthaen
dc.contributor.authorRobideaux, Sharonen_US
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Summeren
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on December 12, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- English.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis empirical study examines the role of lexical priming in first-year college student writers' abilities to consider multiple audiences. The writing topic assigned to all 165 first-year students is identical except for the audience: one-third of the students wrote a persuasive letter to an authority figure; one-third wrote a persuasive letter to a close friend; and one-third were not given an audience assignment, but were instructed to write a persuasive essay. Their responses were analyzed for evidence of Audience-Sensitivity Traits and of lexical priming, i.e., phonological strings that can indicate awareness of audience, a theory based on work by Michael Hoey and David Kaufer and colleagues. Although some specific variables yielded inconclusive results, overall, it can be concluded that student writers effectively "primed" their readers to read as the writers directed, that they effectively used lexical priming to write within assigned genres, and that most of the writers did not display overt egocentrism. These results also confirm hypotheses regarding audience intimacy behavior such as those proposed by Bracewell, Scardamalia, and Bereiter; Barry Kroll; and Vincent Puma. Further, this study furnishes evidence of the usefulness of computerized text-tagging software (DocuScope®) to aid the rhetorician in textual analysis, even as it exposes some problems with such software.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b61519595en_US
dc.identifier.oclc183440954en_US
dc.identifier.otherRobideauxS-072707-D8317en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4844
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2007 Dissertations
dc.subject.lcshPersuasion (Rhetoric)en_US
dc.subject.lcshWriting -- Ability testingen_US
dc.subject.lcshCollege students' writingsen_US
dc.subject.lcshLexical phonologyen_US
dc.titleLike dancers following each other's steps: an analysis of lexical cues in student writing for differing audiencesen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglisheng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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