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dc.contributor.advisorAkiba, Motokoen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Hui, 1976 Mar. 4-en_US
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.date.submitted2007 Springen
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.en_US
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on October 16, 2007)en_US
dc.descriptionVita.en_US
dc.descriptionIncludes bibliographical references.en_US
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.en_US
dc.descriptionDissertations, Academic -- University of Missouri--Columbia -- Educational leadership and policy analysis.en_US
dc.description.abstractUsing the TIMSS 1999 data, this study examined school expectations and initiatives for promoting parental involvement at middle school level in 30 nations. In most countries, schools were more likely to expect parental involvement at home (e.g., prepare child lunchbox) and less likely to get parents involved in school governance. No significant relationship was found between national level of school expectations for parental involvement and national level of student academic achievement or attendance rate. Contrary to our expectation, the relationship between the national level of school expectation for direct parental involvement and national level of educational inequality was positively significant. In addition, national level of school initiatives in parental involvement was also positively associated with educational inequality. Comparison of six nations (Unites States, Canada, the Czech Republic, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the Netherlands) revealed that different school characteristics were associated with high levels of expectations and initiatives for parental involvement in different nations. Unlike other counties whose schools' expectation were influenced by a least one of those structural characteristics (school size, class size, et al.), U.S. schools' expectations for parental involvement were more likely to be affected by schools' cultural factors, such as teacher collaboration and school disciplinary issues. In the U.S., students attended school more often in those school that had higher levels of expectations for parental involvement. Students in the United States were more likely to achieve better if their schools had higher expectations for parents' direct involvement. However, in Czech and Taiwan, school expectations or initiatives were negatively related to student attendance rates or mathematics achievement. Implications for educational policies and practices in these nations and future research were discussed.en_US
dc.identifier.merlin.b60589887en_US
dc.identifier.oclc174251725en_US
dc.identifier.otherZhaoH-051107-D6623en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10355/4851
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
dc.relation.ispartof2007 Freely available dissertations (MU)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri-Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertations. Dissertations. 2007 Dissertations
dc.subjectTrends in International Math and Science Study.en_US
dc.subjectTrends in International Math and Science Studyen_US
dc.subject.lcshEducation -- Parent participationen_US
dc.subject.lcshMathematics -- Study and teaching -- Parent participationen_US
dc.subject.lcshScience -- Study and teaching -- Parent participationen_US
dc.titleSchool expectations and initiatives for parental involvement in 30 nations: a comparative study using TIMSS 1999 dataen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational leadership and policy analysisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaen_US
thesis.degree.levelDoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US


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