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dc.contributor.advisorStallmann, Judith I.eng
dc.contributor.authorPatron Galeana, Eunice, 1976-eng
dc.coverage.spatialUnited Stateseng
dc.coverage.spatialMexicoeng
dc.coverage.spatialNorth Americaeng
dc.date.issued2007eng
dc.date.submitted2007 Falleng
dc.descriptionThe entire dissertation/thesis text is included in the research.pdf file; the official abstract appears in the short.pdf file (which also appears in the research.pdf); a non-technical general description, or public abstract, appears in the public.pdf file.eng
dc.descriptionTitle from title screen of research.pdf file (viewed on February 27, 2008)eng
dc.descriptionVita.eng
dc.descriptionThesis (Ph. D.) University of Missouri-Columbia 2007.eng
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation consists of three papers. "Optional sales tax holidays: Which jurisdictions participate? Logit and a spatial analyses," I reviewed the literature regarding strategic interaction among jurisdictions and border effects due to tax differentials. I used a logit model to estimate whether or not Missouri cities will participate or not in the 2004 sales tax holiday. I found that cities consider their own characteristics and their neighbor's characteristics when making the decision to participate in the tax holiday. I did not find evidence of spatial autocorrelation, perhaps because other variables already contain some spatial information. "Convergence of Mexican states, 1993-2004" examines the convergence implications of the Solow (1956) neoclassical economic growth model for Mexico. There is no evidence of unconditional [beta] convergence. There is evidence of conditional [beta] convergence and its value is 2.37 percent. There were mixed results for [sigma] convergence among Mexican states. "Disparities in Productivity Growth in Mexico, 1993-2004" examines the behavior of productivity among Mexican states for 1993-2004. I investments in physical capital are negatively related to productivity, states attracting labor force have higher productivity, human capital increases productivity. States with a higher percentage of indigenous population have lower productivity than the rest of the country.eng
dc.description.bibrefIncludes bibliographical referenceseng
dc.identifier.merlinb6221875xeng
dc.identifier.oclc212181848eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.32469/10355/4866eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/4866
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccess.eng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.
dc.subject.lcshEconomicseng
dc.subject.lcshSales taxeng
dc.subject.lcshAgricultural productivityeng
dc.subject.lcshCapital productivityeng
dc.subject.lcshLabor productivityeng
dc.titleNeighborhood effects, convergence and growth in open economies of U.S. and Mexicoeng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural economics (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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