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dc.contributor.advisorLazzaro-Weis, Caroleng
dc.contributor.authorGossett, Scotteng
dc.date.issued2015eng
dc.date.submitted2015 Falleng
dc.description.abstractCajuns have traditionally been defined as originating from French Acadian refugees who arrived in Louisiana from present-day Nova Scotia beginning in the late eighteenth century. However many of the people today who identify with the Cajun ethnicity are not descendants of those Acadian settlers. Moreover, this and other modern definitions of 'Cajun' have been solidified fairly recently in the twentieth century and have been formed through a dialogue with Anglo-American stereotypes. These stereotypes restrict the identity and ignore the major influences from a plethora of diverse cultures: French, Spanish, American, Irish, German, African, and Native American. This study provides a Francophone alternative to the English stereotypes that more accurately portrays the complexities of Cajun identity and provides an alternative portrayal with which to enter a dialogue.eng
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10355/48688
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10-32469/10355/48688eng
dc.languageEnglisheng
dc.publisherUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
dc.relation.ispartofcommunityUniversity of Missouri--Columbia. Graduate School. Theses and Dissertationseng
dc.rightsOpenAccesseng
dc.rights.licenseThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.eng
dc.titlel'Ecorce grossiere, l'ame aristocrate : literary representations of Cajuns in Francophone Louisiana, nineteenth century to presenteng
dc.typeThesiseng
thesis.degree.disciplineRomance languages (MU)eng
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Missouri--Columbiaeng
thesis.degree.levelDoctoraleng
thesis.degree.namePh. D.eng


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